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From: 2172 Independent Elder Care Professionals

Eldercare Professionals Answer Medicaid and Medicare Questions

    My mother has applied for Medicaid in Florida. She has several credit cards that she wants to give to my Brother. The cards would remain in her name, due to his bad credit. He would use the cards and make the monthly payments on the cards. Is this OK ? Will this in any way, affect her application for Medicaid ?
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    Eric B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The only answer I can give is, "Why would she want to do something like this?" It sounds like a really bad idea. If she is on Medicaid, she is assumed insolvent. Doing this could make her an accessory to fraud if he did not pay the debt. Besides that, I cannot see why Medicaid would care because no assets or income is involved.

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    My mother is 78 years old. She never signed up for part a medicare. Now she has has health problems and needs Medicare Part A. She has part B and medical but her heart surgeon works at a hospital who only takes medicare part A. How can my elderly mother now get Medicare Part A?
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    Ruth P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Go to ssa.gov and locate the Medicare application. She needs to apply. She will pay a penalty for her late enrollment in that she will pay a higher premium.

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    My parents are over 65 and immigrated to the U.S. after retirement (more than 5 years ago). They have no Medicare, income, or assets. They currently live with my brother and his family, and my brother and I pay for their living expenses. Can they qualify for Medicaid even though my brother has more income and assets than the Medicaid requirements?
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    Barbara B. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    You can best get your question answered by either an Elder Law Attorney, or by talking with the State of Washington Department of Health Services.
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    Kendra G. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Medicaid is based on your parents income and financial resources.

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    My mother is on Medicaid in New York and resides in a nursing home. She has retained the allowable $14,400 in assets. What can these assets be used for? If there are still assets available upon her death, does this money get returned to Medicaid?
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Funds maybe used as she wishes, except she may not transfer them to another person if she is in or may go into a nursing home within 60 months of that transfer. Medicaid does have a right to recover but only if the assets pass through her estate, that is if she owns them in her name alone and they are not paid upon her death to someone.

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    My father-in-law is in a nursing home & has been since April 2013. My mother in law still lives in their home but she has Alzheimer's Disease and cannot stay alone anymore. My husband wants to move her in with us for right now. Down, the road, she may have to be placed in a nursing home, tho. My husband and his Sister want to sell their house. What can she do with the money that comes from the sale of the house? We know Medicaid takes my father in laws half of the sale as he is on Medicaid and we were told they would get his half upon sale of house. What should we do so that Medicaid will not complain if she would happen to go into a facility later and apply for Medicaid. Thank You.
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    Marilyn L. , answers:
    Have you considered using a trust?

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    I'm interested in the services provided by Medicare. Can you provide some professional expertise in terms of the particular coverage of Medicare? What are some of the coverage areas?
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    Ronald F. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    You can find specifics on the types of services Medicare will cover at www.medicare.gov or www.medicarerights.org. In terms of coverage for home care or nursing home care, Medicare's coverage is limited. Medicare covers up to 100 days of nursing home care after a 3 day hospital stay if the patient has skilled nursing care. The first 20 days are fully covered and from the 21st day to the 100th day, the patient will have to pay a co-pay of $144.50/day unless a supplemental insurance will cover the co-pay. To get some home care services, Medicare will cover only intermittent skilled nursing care or physical therapy in the home and may authorize for home attendant services along with the skilled care or therapy. While Medicare is great to have, it is not the coverage to rely on if an individual needs home attendant services or nursing home coverage for long term. Medicaid may be available to cover those costs.
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    margaret d. , answers:
    MEDICARE WILL ONLY COVER A SHORT PERIOD IF THERE HAS BEN A SUIGNIFICANT CHANGE IN A PERSON'S CONDITION, E.G THEY ARE JUST DISCHARGED FROM A HOSPITAL OR REHAB FACILITY. MEDICARE DOES NOT COVER ONGOING NURSING CARE AT HOME. MEDICARE WILL COVER SUPPLIES AND DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIMENT. HOPE THIS HELPS.
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    Debra D. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    The government has a very thorough website www.medicare.gov that outlines this

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    My Mother is applying for Mainecare and is entering an Assisted Living Facility. All she has is: a few dollars in the bank and her home. Can I protect her home from an Estate Claim when she passes? Is it too late?
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    Martin W. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The general answer is is yes, but a more specific answer depends on what her assets are and how they are titled.

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    My mom is in NEW YORK, in a nursing home. We want to move her to a nursing home on the West Coast (California in specific). She gets social security and medicaid and MediCal. I am wondering if those benefits for the elderly will transfer to California. Can we set up a nursing home and somewhere to go ahead of time, for when she arrives here?
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    Joseph M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    You Mom's current Medicaid benefits will not transfer, per se. Your Mom will simply have to apply for Medi-Cal benefits in California. She will not be able to do this until she resides her, but there is no residency requirement. Regarding the facility, Medi-Cal only pays for a licensed, skilled nursing home, which sounds like what your Mom needs. Finding a place that will accept someone on Medi-Cal can be a little difficult, but if you look around now, find a facility you like, then talk to their administration, you might be able to have them commit to a room, knowing that your Mom is going to immediately apply for Medi-Cal. However, be prepared, they may want 1 months private pay rate to do this. If you can pay this, you can get reimbursed by Medi-Cal when the application is made, but it has to be from your funds, not your Mother's. Hope this helps.
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    Dennis S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    I assume you mean that she gets Medicare and Medicaid in New York. In California, Medicaid is known as Medi-Cal. If she moved to California, she would need to apply for Medi-Cal, as that is a state program. Her Medicare and Social Security would continue, as those are federal programs. You would have to speak to the nursing home as to whether they would accept her as medi-Cal pending or require her to private pay until she qualifies for Medi-Cal in California.
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    Ronald A. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The answer to each of your questions is yes. You can make these arrangements, on the come.

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    My mother has dementia. She lives in a home that is 50 miles away from me. I am currently recertifying her for Medicare. Does my demented mother need to sign the back of the form?
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    Kathryn M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The Medicaid Recertification form can be signed by you as Agent under your mother's Power of Attorney or as her "representative". Your mother does not need to sign it unless she is capable of doing so and fully understands what she is signing. It appears from your question that your mother lacks that ability due to her dementia.

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    My mother is 55 years old and she has been disabled for approximately 13 years now. My father is also disabled. My father receives both Medicaid and Medicare. My mother, however, receives only Medicaid through the social security office. Can my mother also qualify for Medicare? How does she become eligible for applying?
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    Pi-Yi M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Yes if you Mom has the required number of quarters of coverage from payments into the Social Security system she can file a claim for disability just like your Father did.

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    My husband is receiving Medicaid. His Medicaid, though, expires May 31st, 2013. Medicare, however, won't kick in until September 2013. What does he do in the meantime? Can we ask for a Extenstion for Medicaid until Medicare picks it up?
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    Valerie H. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    I don't understand the terminology used for Medicaid expiring. Medicaid does not come with an expiration date. When one has to reassess or "re-apply" and the financial situation has changed then the person would no longer be eligible. Nonetheless, there is not in between program. I would suggest that you either contact Stafford Department of Social Services or Rappahannock Area Agency on Aging to gain a better understanding as to why his services are ending. I could actually check into it for you but I would have to charge for the follow through. Good luck.

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    My aunt is in a nursing home right now and we are applying for Medicaid. I need to ascertain her assets. Is her trust fund considered an asset? We really don't want to include the trust fund in her assets. We understood that this trust fund would not be used as payment for expenses at the nursing home. So is a trust fund accessible to the state in order to pay for Nursing Care expenses?
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    Linda L. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    It would depend what the trust language is. That's what it all hinges on. An elder law attorney should be retained to review it and provide you with the answer.
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    Robert S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The answer is going to depend primarily on the provisions and wording of the trust. If the trust specifically prohibits distributions of principal for the nursing care of the individual, then the principal assets of the trust may be excluded. This would also apply if the trust is only to distribute income to the beneficiary during his or her life. If the trust allows distributions of principal for the general care and maintenance of the individual, the Medicaid agency in your state is likely to include the trust assets as available resources.

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    My step-mother is 76 years old. She is nearly blind, possibly has dementia or Alzheimer's. She was also diagnosed epileptic and removed from high school. So why can't someone with her issues qualify for Medicaid Part B?
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    John K. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Have you been told why you mother does not qualify for part B? Generally you need only to be over 65 and a citizen of the United States to enroll in part B.

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    My Mother in Law is 95 years old. Her daughter, who is my wife, is the POA for the mother. We continue to receive mother's social security benefit which we will forward to my MIL's nursing home (the Hebrew Home for Greater Washington). I need to file "representative payee" with Soc. Sec. Office, I am told. Is this true? Is so, where can I find a blank application form so that I might be able to proceed to file this. Thank you very much.
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    William W. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    I am no longer admitted in Maryland. However, the Rep Payee form is available at your local Social Security Administration office. You will need Mom's SSN and evidence of your authority.
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    Robert B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Your mother-in-law requires the appointment of a Representative Payee because the Social Security Administration (SSA) would only release information to the beneficiary or the Representative Payee, regardless of whether or not there is an attorney-in-fact as identified in a Power of Attorney Document. It may be necessary to obtain income verifications or Medicare information, particularly as she is in long-term care, which would be accessible only to the Representative Payee, particularly if she is incapacitated. You, your wife, or the Hebrew Home could apply to be your mother-in-law’s Representative Payee. The application can be found here: http://www.ssa.gov/online/ssa-11.pdf Additional information can be found on SSA’s website here: http://www.ssa.gov/payee/index.htm

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    My mother is 86 years old. My brother and I are now considering having her go into a nursing home using governemental (medicaid) assistance.

    Her house was signed over to us more than 5 years ago so I know we are all right there.

    Where we are unsure about whether the government may take back money for her nursing home costs, is in regards to a savings And checking account on which my brother and I are named.

    If I withdraw funds from that account, and then she has to go to a nursing home, will be required to repay the moneys that we took from that account for her nursing home costs? My mother was 86 years old in October and I am trying to find out how all this works.
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    Linda G. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    I am quite sure that there is a five year look back period in terms of monies transferred as well. Perhaps you can contact your local bar association. Some associations give a gratis short phone consultation which might give you additional information. Hopefully, your mom has a will . Perhaps, you can contact that attorney for answers as well.

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    Can my mother give small money gifts to her grandchildren? She is filing for Medicaid. Will these gifts be held against her re: that Medicaid application?
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    Marty B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    A good elder law attorney in Mass will be able to help you protect assets in a way that will not disqualify your mother from Medicaid benefits. Look to www.NAWLA.org to find a local attorney. You are lucy to be in Mass as there are a lot of very good Elder Law Attorneys there.
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    John T G. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    No, she should not gift any money away. Any transfers for less than fair market value will be considered disqualifying transfers and will trigger a disqualification period. I would recommend consulting with an experienced elder law attorney who specializes in MassHealth applications to learn more about permissible spenddown strategies to help preserve as much of your mother's assets as possible.
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    Roberta S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    I know from experience that small gifts will not be noticed by the caseworker reviewing the bank statements. Usually, the caseworker will question expenditures or deposits only if they are $500 or more.
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    Patricia B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    no gifting is allowed and may be held against her when applying for medicaid in Massachusetts.

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    I was put on both Medicare A and Medicare Part B. I never, though intended to sign up for part-B. The problem is, Medicare Part B is costing me $100.00. I am still working and have coverage. How can I stop this coverage please?
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    Dagmar P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    You can get a form from your employer through the Human Resources office certifying that you have coverage and take that in to the social security office and they will remove Part B.

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    My elderly dad has Medicaid just for long term care. He recently won a lawsuit giving him a sum of money.
    Will Medicaid take that money? Currently, he has a pooled trust where the money awarded is supposed to go. When I recertify him for Medicaid the statement will show the money was deposited to the trust. Is that jeopardizing his long term care Medicaid payments?
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    Joan R. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Unless the defendant was a nursing home,If your dad is over 65, placing money in the pooled trust will affect his ongoing eligibility for Medicaid in a skilled nursing facility, as will his retaining more than $14,400 in his name. A plan for gifting some of the assets and using remaining assets may be implemented. Even if the nursing home was a defendant, the remaining money upon his demise will be available to reimburse Medicaid.

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    I am trying to help my grandparents qualify for a nursing home. I wonder, what is the Medicaid divisor for Dallas County, TX (Irving)?
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    Cheryl A A. , Nurse and Care Manager answers:
    First of all, they need to qualify for a nursing home based on a medical need - not just care that can be provided by a non-nurse, called custodial care. Medicaid is a state program, so it is not county driven and there are Medicaid programs that offer some assistance in the home. Yes, Irving is in Dallas County & I would recommend that you check out community resources for Irving as well as Dallas county that may be of assistance for your grandparents. Good for you for helping out.
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    Richard B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    $142.92 per day

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    Can a senior who is receiving Medicare with Medicaid in New York continue those benefits in Puerto Rico or does she have to reapply and get new cards?
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    Ronald F. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    She would have to reapply for Medicaid benefits in Puerto Rico.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Medicare is federal and can be used any where. Medicaid, not sure, but probarly better to reapply.

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    My mom was living with me in Bronx, , but after a while we realized she could not do the steps anymore. So, we moved her in with my sister in Nassau, Long Island and we need to get her Medicaid benefits transferred to her present address out there. How do we do this easily?
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    Sabrina M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    I believe the best thing to do is to go to the Medicaid office in Nassau Co. with your Mom, or if she cannot do it, with appropriate documentation allowing you to act for her.
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    David G. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    When a Medicaid recipient moves from one social services district to another within New York state, the social services official administering Medicaid to the recipient shall continue Medicaid coverage until the end of the month after the month in which the move is reported, provided that the recipient: has informed the district of his new address and any material changes in circumstances and is otherwise eligible for Medicaid; and has not become a recipient of medical assistance in the district to which he has moved. After the last day of continued coverage, the recipient shall be eligible without further application for Medicaid in the district to which he has moved. In other words, Medicaid recipients need only inform the original district of their new address and any other material changes in circumstances effecting eligibility. The new district will pick up coverage at the expiration of that time period even if eligibility is still being evaluated. This does not apply when an institutionalized recipient moves from one social services district to another.

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    Due to failing health it is no longer safe for me to drive. I am visually impaired and very ill. I want to sell my sedan w/low miles and give the proceeds to settle a credit card debt I can't afford to pay. I'm afraid somehow somebody from the government would audit my checking a/c and see a deposit of roughly $8,000 (estimate of Blue Book Value of my car). The money would be paid directly to the Collections Agency. I feel a deep conviction about paying my debts and truly want to use my car to settle my past debt obligation. If I get a bank draft from CarMax and write a check to the Collection Agency, will I lose my medicaid?
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    Richard H. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    If you are currently on Medicaid, then you would need to spend down the $8k ASAP! That is fine though and if you do you will not lose your benefits. Paying off your credit card is a great way to spend down, just make the transaction quickly, report it to your local medicaid office and all is well. This sort of spend down is not considered a gift and there will be no penalty.
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    Richard H. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    No.

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    Recently, my elderly parent received a monthly bill for $900 from a medical provider. There was no explaination about what this charge is for. Does such a vague bill violate Medicare rules and regulations?
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    Patricia O. , Nurse and Care Manager answers:
    The best action would be to contact the provider and make sure they had your parents correct Medicare and any supplemental insurance information so they could bill correctly. Then make sure the bill was submitted to Medicare. You can ask for a statement that details out what the charges are for.

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    The situation is that the wife was deceased in November and her husband is in a nursing home. The home was purchased in the wife's name. How can we sell the house without having to re-do Medicare certification? We have an extremely interested buyer for the house so we need to move quickly.
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    Virginia L. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    If you are talking about "Medicaid" certification, in my opinion, you will need expert advice.

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    My elderly mother is currently in a nursing home. Prior to entering into the nursing home she leased, and lived in a home owned by my brother and myself. She is about to be removed from the Medicare program, and after spending down $105,000 in assets (IRAs and annuities) she will be part of the Medicaid program. My question is: Does my mother's continued rent payments to my brother and to me, affect the depletion of funds she is doing prior to Medicare covering her nursing home expenses.
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    Deborah H. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    I will answer your question as though it read "prior to Medicaid (not Medicare) covering her nursing home expenses." In short, the answer is that it should not affect eligibility, especially if your mother had a written lease and the lease was a reasonable amount. Medicaid. If verbal, you should be prepared to provide supporting documention that the monies being paid to you and your brother were for rent by proving your mother was living in a property that you own. Did you or your brother provide care for your mother in addition to leasing property to her? If so, and you can prove that the care you provided kept her out of a nursing home for two years, she can legally transfer assets to you up to the dollar amount of the state average cost of care, as compensation for the care she received from you in your home, (i.e.was she living with you?). You should also make certain that her needs are covered, before she is spent down to the Medicaid threshold of “$1600 in nonexempt assets. ( For example, does she have a prepaid irrevocable funeral contract in place within the maximum Medicaid limit of $5400 (exclusive of burial space items)? Now is the time to get her what she needs by way of health check ups, dentures, hearing aids, etc. while she has assets to purchase same.
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    Sharon P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    So your mother's assets can be no more than $1,600.00 in Connecticut (assumes she doesn't have a spouse still) to qualify for Medicaid payments in a nursing home. We also have excellent Medicaid home care programs. If she is going to reside in the nursing home, then all of her income goes to the nursing home each month; she cannot pay rent in most cases. She can deduct $60 each month for personal needs and if she's paying for a supplemental medicare policy, she can deduct this also prior to paying the nursing home. There are some exceptions if she is going to return home.

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    My mother's primary care doctor refused to care for her while she was in the emergency room and after she was admitted to the hospital as an inpatient. He has done so because he indicates that he would not be paid. I have spoken about this to her carrier and confirmed that he would be paid. My mother has a Medicare advantage coverage through Blue Cross Blue Shield. I have talked to the primary care dr and he said that there should not be a problem but I have had this problem twice. She was then referred to another dr who knew nothing about her or her care. What can I do?
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    Denise C. , Nurse and Care Manager answers:
    Sorry to hear of your troubles; unfortunately with poor reimbursement rates n delay in payments many physicians are being more apprehensive with their patient selection.ant are using hospitalist to cover their patients while inpatient and denying new patients based on their insurance coverage. If mom really likes her primary doctor she may wish to switch insurance during open enrollment or switch physician to one who is on BC/BS provider list. Best wishes to both of you !
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    Dara G. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    You cannot force her doctor to treat her or visit her or care for her in the hospital. Doctors may choose their patients. That being said, I suggest that you get her file \records copied and meet with the physician who has been assigned to her care. If you have a power of attorney for health care you can be involved in the process. Best of luck to you.

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    I live in New Hampshire and I share a joint banking account with my elderly mother and father. I have been on this account since 1996. My question is: am I entitled to half of the money in the account before the medicaid eligibility calculations go into effect for my senior parents' medicaid process. Btw, the balance in the account is below $10,000.
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    Roberta S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The funds in a joint account are presumed to be owned by the medicaid applicant(s). Your name is presumed to be on the account for convenience only. This presumption can be overcome if you can prove that you deposited any funds into the account. In these cases, I prepare an Affidavit to be signed by the child, with deposit slips attached, and proof of where the child's deposit came from (usually from the child's individual bank account).
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    Brian S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    While I am not licensed to practice law in New Hamphire, the answer to you question is that the bank account will likely be attributed to your parents. However, if you can prove contribution to the account, you may be able to argue that portion to which you contributed belongs to you. I would suggest that you set up an opportunity to discuss your parents planning with an Elder Law Attorney who can assist them in planning. Listing you as a joint account holder has risks for both them and you.
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    Celeste R. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    The bank account will be divided into thirds; 1/3 for you, and 1/3 for each of your parents. The look back period is 5 yrs.

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    My mother is 90 years old. she had a 3/4 inch kidney stone completely blocking her right ureter. after being on an IV antibiotic for 4 - 6 weeks, surgery was performed and the stone removed. During this process her knee was irritated and became extremely painful. She stayed in a rehab hospital for 100 days and was released 12/19. Now, my elderly mother cannot walk. Her right knee is bone on bone and the leg is now showing deformity. Just one day after being released, she fell again. We were told that she could not qualify for medicaid because she scored 90% on cognitive testing. She has no assets and receives only a little over $1000 social security per month. We wanted her to have medicaid so that she could live in a nursing home where she could have proper care. She also is entitled to $1050 from veterans' admin. because my father was a WWII veteran, but we have not applied for it yet. Is there any help for us? Might Medicaid reconsider? Can applying for veteran's benefits help her get the elder care she needs?
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    Cheryl A A. , Nurse and Care Manager answers:
    Qualification for Medicaid is not dependent on a diagnosis, it is based on financial assets and belongings, as well as need i.e. nursing home placement.
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    Carole L. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    You need an eldercare attorney that specializes in VA aid and Attendance Benefit Planning as well as Medicaid Planning. NOT ANY LAWYER will do. they must have this specialty. Ask your local Area Agency on Aging for a recommendation of one. If they can't recommend one, then ask other lawyers. DO NOT hire someone who says they can do probate work. that's not good enough. Good Luck!
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    Kay P. , Family Counselor Mediator answers:
    Your mother needs assistance with her Activities of Daily Living. Her mental status should not be a factor in Medicaid. I'm assuming you are in Tx. Most nursing home will not accept a patient on Medicaid immediately, but they will let her live in the home and pay privately for a few months, and then give her a Medicaid room. Her S.S. plus VA probably will not be enough to pay nursing home costs, which will run around '$5000/mo. Community Based Alternatives is a Medicaid program that provides in-home care. However, given your mother physicial decline, she needs round the clock care. If you are in the Dallas area I can suggest homes that will take "Medicaid pending". If not, you can go to Medicare.gov and search in your area for nursing homes that accept Medicaid, then call each and ask about the wait time for a Medicaid bed. Good luck.

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    My aunt has $10,000 in savings and may need to go into a nursing facility in the near future. Would she qualify for Medicaid assistance in Florida?
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    Laurie O. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    In order to qualify for nursing home Medicaid, the applicant cannot have more than $2,000 in assets. You can preserve some of her $10,000 (and not spend it down on the nursing home) if you seek the advice of a qualified elder law attorney.
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    Gretchen T. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    For your aunt to qualify for Florida nursing home Medicaid, her income can not be more than $2,094.00 a month (2012 standard) and assets can not exceed $2,000.00. I would be glad to speak with you about the application process in Florida because there are many different ways a person can qualify for Medicaid, including obtaining an Elder Law Attorney for estates that need special treatment. Please call me

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    I live in California and would like to give money as a gift to my children like I always have done. I have just moved into an assisted living home and would still like to give the gifts, but I was told that if I need medicaid they may come after the money I have given, or will give as gifts. I don't want that to happen , is there a certain amount of a gift or is it all gifts (of Money)?
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    Marty B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    At this point in California you can continue to make gifts with little effect on your Medi-Cal eligibility, depending on the size of the gift. It is important to know how Medi-Cal calculates their penalty on gifts you make. Once you understand the formula you will be able to determine what gifts you would like to make, when, and for how much. In determining the penalty in California you take the value of the gift and divided it by the average private pay rate for a nursing home. Currently the average private pay rate is $7098 per month. So here is an example: I want to make a gift to my two children of $25,000 each. I divide the gift by the average private pay rate or $25000 / $7089 = 3.52. This gives me the number of months i will be ineligible for Medi-Cal. Two interesting things to note. They round down, so i will really be ineligible for 3 months. Also, the penalties for each gift run concurrently so even though i transferred a total of $50,000 i will only be ineligible for three months. Any gifts under $7,098 will result in no period of ineligibility. This is not your question, but it come up very often in the context of gifting. I have heard many people ask me, because they have heard that they con only give away $10,000 or $13,000 a year. This has nothing to do with most people who are applying for Medi-Cal. What this is, is the federal annual gift tax exclusion. It is currently $13,000 but is scheduled to go up to $14,000 a year in January of 2013. But this rule is important only to people who have estates that are likely to be greater than $1,000,000. If your estate is under $1,000,000 then you don't need to worry about going over the annual gift tax exclusion amount. As Steven already mentioned, it is a good idea to talk to an Elder Law Attorney. You should have your trust and powers of attorney reviewed by an Elder Law Attorney because many estate planning attorneys are not familiar with the requirements for Medi-Cal planning which makes it difficult or impossible to do Medi-Cal planning if you become incapacitated
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    Martha P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Marty B. Gave you a good answer. If you are worried about qualifying for Medi-Cal you should get legal advice from an Elder Law Attorney. I have an e-course on Medi-Cal at www.LearnMedi-Cal.com.
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    Steven B. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    This is a great question, and as it relates to a legal issue, I would highly recommending speaking to an elderlaw attorney in your local area that specializes in MediCal Planning. You can locate such a specialist by going to the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys(NAELA) website: www.naela.org, from which you can do a quick search to identify a professional close to you. The investment of paying for a consultation, can save you alot in making the best decision that will not negatively impact your in the future. Steven Barlam, MSW, LCSW, CMC Chief Professional Officer, Co-Founder, LivHOME, Inc.

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    My sister-in-law is in a nursing home in the State of Florida. Medicare and Medicaid is all she has. The home in question, however, is charging her husband #1100.00 per month. He cannot afford to pay the home and has already gone through any savings and cannot pay his rent. Is there assistance provided to those aged who are patient in a nursing home with Medicare and Medicaid? Should there still out of pocket expenses by the spouse if he has a limited income? Please help.
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    William J. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Yes. Florida has Medicaid programs that help cover nursing home, assisted living and home health care expenses. Usually the patient must pay their income to the facility. However, you may be able to divert some or all of the patient's income back to the spouse at home. This is known as "spousal diversion" and the amount of income diverted is based on the spouse at home's income and shelter costs. Also , if the patient is a veteran, VA benefits might be available. I offer free consultations.

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    I need to get assisted living for my father. There is a facility right near me (in Staughton). He is 78 and diabetic. And while he is medicare eligible, I cannot figure out how to get his move to this facility covered. The home itself, is a smallish operation and I don't really think they know all the rules. Can anyone help?
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    Renee W. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    If your Dad is a war time Veteran (does not mean he fought in the country of the battle) he can receive up to $2,000 a month to help him with his stay. It is called Aid &Attendance Pension. You need to consult an accredited Veterans attorney such as myself. My office is in Caro, Mich. can I help?
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    Steve M. , answers:
    You ask a good question. I am going to try to do this in bullet fashion for clarity. - Medicare never pays for assisted living (as a general rule) - If a senior enrolls in a Medicare Advantage Program (Senior HMO, PACE, ACO) those organizations then receive the Medicare dollars and are responsible for providing healthcare (but not housing). If a senior had need for skilled nursing services, it would be allowable for those organizations to pay for that care in an assisted living community or a skilled nursing facility. Normally this would would be for no more than 100 days, but in fact rarely if ever happens at all. - Finally there is something called a Medicare Waiver Program, that has been adopted by some states and how it works varies quite a bit from state to state. These program is for people who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. Many of these people who need only intermittent skilled nursing services end up in nursing homes, for lack of any other place to be cared for which is an expensive proposition. So in these cases the a portion of the money that would have been paid through the medicaid program can be channeled to an assisted living community. There are two important keys here. The state has to have a waiver program and the resident has to need some type or types of skilled nursing services.
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    Nancy N. , Nurse and Care Manager answers:
    Medicare does not cover for assisted living. It will cover for a brief time following a hospitalization if there is a skilled need, nursing or therapy if placement is in a skilled nursing facility. The facilities themselves have a good idea of when coverage is available.
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    Ross H. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Neither Medicaid nor Medicare cover Assisted Living. If his income is below (approximately) $1200 per month, and the Assisted Living facility accepts it, he may be able to get an "Auxiliary Grant" which in Virginia is a cruel joke on seniors who need some help with their daily living.
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    Jennifer A. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Medicare does not pay for assisted living facilities such as you've described. Medicare only pays for long term care facilities that followed a hospital stay (which must be of a specific length) and then only to for a limited amount of time and under specific circumstances. The facility MAY be covered by Medicaid, but that is a separate process which has asset and income limitations. Plus that specific facility must accept Medicaid.

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    My father is currently in a nursing home but prior to that he lived with me and during that time I applied for Medicaid coverage. Yesterday, I received approval and a card with a note saying that while the application was accepted, there is a spend-down requirement of $1034.61. But in the time since applying, my father's circumstances have changed. (He fell for the 4th time (he has Alzheimer's dementia and sundowners syndrome) and was placed in home.) It is now the case that the nursing home also sent in a "nursing home" medicaid application. What happens now? Will the nursing home application be denied? Should I go to social services office? If I do go to the office, because they cannot provide info over the phone, must I bring a health care proxy? Thanks
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    Roberta S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The nursing home cannot apply for benefits on your behalf. You can apply on behalf of your father if you are named in his Power of Attorney as his "attorney-in-fact". If not, you can apply on behalf of your father as an "Eligibility Representative". Your first step is calling the regional medicaid office (the office that reviewed the original medicaid application) to find out if your father must re-apply for benefits. You can also walk in and talk to a caseworker. I believe that you will have to file a new application. The good news is that the new form requires the same information about your father's health insurance, income and assets that the original form required. in addition, you must include information about the nursing home, the date of admission, and the balances in your father's bank accounts on the date of admission and on the date the application is filed. You must also file a supplemental form, which includes questions about "resource transfers" (gifts made within five years of nursing home admission). A medical screening must be done to confirm that your father needs nursing home care (the nursing home arranges this). The nursing home must also submit a few forms. In Massachusetts, an applicant for medicaid benefits for in-home care or nursing home care must spend down his or her countable assets to $2,000. So the original spend down amount (1,034.61) will still apply, unless your father's countable assets have increased since you filed the application. Permissible spenddown items include a prepaid funeral contract, a burial needs account holding up to "$1,500, and payments to the nursing home. As soon as your father's countable assets are reduced to $2,000, he will qualify for benefits to pay for his care. Most of his income must be paid to the nursing home after he qualifies. The medicaid program will pay the balance. Your father may keep $72,80 for personal needs and the funds needed to pay premiums on supplemental health insurance. Good luck!!
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    Susana L. , answers:
    Unfortunately, I would need more information to be able to answer the question, and although Medicaid is a federal program,it is run through state medicaid offices, so depending on your state the answer could be different. My jurisdiction is Massachusetts. You should consult with an elder care attorney in your state to assist you. Best regards,
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    Daniel K. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Because of the spend-down, technically the application would have been denied as over resourced, thus the second application by the nursing home. I would contact the social services office, provide them with a copy of the durable general power of attorney/proxy granted you by your father. They should be able to untangle matters.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The nursing home will not be denied since he is there. I would not go to the Social services office, let the nursing home do it. You need not bring a health care proxy. If you need to bring anything, it would be a power of attorney, but generally they allow anyone to act as representive and there is no reason they canot take info over the phone.

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    Mom has no income. She's 70. And I am not sure where to start to get her medicaid benefits. Any help is appreciated
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    Ronald F. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    It is best to seek the assistance of a qualified Elder Law Attorney to determine eligibility and to prepare and submit a Medicaid application package. If Mom resides in NYC or Long Island, we would be happy to assist. We can be reached toll free . If outside of this local, please feel free to call us for a referral to a qualified elder law attorney.
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    Valorie P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    You need to set up an appointment with an attorney, such as someone like me to go over all the basics for medicaid eligibility. Each district and county in New York State has the appropriate regulations and we can discuss these rules.
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    Lauren M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    It would seem that she would qualify as aged, blind, and disabled Medicaid if she met the resource criteria ($4000 liquid). An elder law attorney could review your mother's situation and help with the application and related issues.
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    David T. , Financial Planner answers:
    Please contact me. Give me a call (1-866-272-6557 ext. #20770), and I can assist you in getting the proper Medicaid coverage necessary.
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    Avi M. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Look at some of the community centers/senior centers in the area. Most times they might have a social worker/case worker who could help. Otherwise they can likely point you in the right direction.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    For which purpose, regular doctor visits, home care or a nursing home? The differences would matter in terms of where you apply? You say she has no income, does she have assets or own a home? There are no specialists who get the person benefits, that is always up to medicaid. There are people, however, who can help you to apply. But it seems like what kind of governmental assistance you need is dependent on the answers to the other questions that I posed above.

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    My wife and I both need Medicaid to help manage medical conditions. We cannot afford necessary treatments and medication without help. I applied for Medicaid assistance on Aug. 31st of 2012. When can we expect to learn of the status of our application? I called the Medicaid administration and they said they had no record of me?!
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    Jessica R. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Community Medicaid applications can take between 3 to 6 months to process depending upon the office. Make sure to follow-up that you have submitted all necessary documents. Good luck
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    Nelly K. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    I can help you determine the status of your application. Either it was not filed properly or was rejected or is lost in the system. I have a lot of experience successfully obtaining Medicaid benefits. Call me for a free consulatation.
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    Thomas J. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    I have a contact at Medicaid. I would need you name and SS # to get a sense of your application status. Thomas Johnson, LCSW
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    Helene B. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Medicaid is very delayed in their denials and/or approvals. I am not sure who in the 'Medicaid Administration' you contacted, but I suggest you call the Casemanager originally assigned to you. I am assuming you submitted copies of all your documentations so you will be able to resubmit if necessary.
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    Barbara P. , Geriatrician answers:
    This can be a lenghthy process, however if they have no record of the patient, it might be a good idea to re submit. Generally, may need to solicit assistance from legal aide
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    David T. , Financial Planner answers:
    Like other professionals have mentioned, it can depend on how you submitted the Medicaid application but can also depend on who you spoke with regarding the status. If you give me a call, we can discuss some of the details involved and I will be able to verify the exact status of the application. It officially takes 30-45 to get an answer but many times it can be processed quicker. Either way, if the application was submitted on August 31st, it should be in the system. Additionally, if you are in need of home care services, I can possibly start that up for you before the Medicaid gets approved.
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    Elliot S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Your application may have already been rejected, Call me for a free consultation concerning your medicaid problem.
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    Barbara K. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    filing a Medicaid application is a bit involved. If they have no record, they may have rejected the application because when an application is rejected, it no longer appears in their system. I think you need to contact an elder law attorney who specializes in Medicaid applications and have them work with you to submit it. If you are in NYC try to call the NY City Bar Association Legal referral service, they may be able to recommend someone.
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    Harriette S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    More details are needed to properly answer your question. How was your medicaid applications filed? In person or by mail? Where were they filed? Where did you make your inquiry?
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    Benjamin M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Every county processes applications differently. You may have been in a county where you met with an intake worker instead of the actual caseworker. In such a situation, it can take several weeks for your application to reach the appropriate case worker. It is best to bring copies of what you submitted to an elder law attorney who can then help guide you through the process. The attorney and his office can speak with the appropriate people at the Board of Social Services and then help you provide any verifications that Medicaid may still require. This will help speed up the process.
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    Lauren M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    An elder law attorney can review what you presented in your application and key qualifications such as assets, income and your disability and health status, and then contact the appropriate person at the Board of Social Services to see where they are in the application process and what items they may need to complete their determination in a timely way. You should contact an elder law attorney for help.

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    My MIL is ill and needs more than just the ~6 hrs. of help she currently gets from a medicare funded home health care aide. Even though she lives in my basement, we were told that she could be eligible for 24 hr. coverage if she lives in a domicile of her own. Is this correct?
    What type of build out of the basement would we need to do, at the minimum, to demonstrate her independence and therefore the need for an all-day HHC aide? Is a separate entrance and kitchen enough for the medicare inspectors?
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    Arlene S. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    If the MIL or her husband were veterans she might qualify for assistance to pay an aide.
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    Marci V. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    I do not think that any type of housing would enable your MIL to receive 24hr Medicare covered care. Home health funded by Medicare is goal based. Most specifically a specific discipline such as OT, PT, skilled nursing will develop a plan of care to help the individual, ideally, return to his her prior level of functioning and then will discontinue services. Intermediate or custodial care is not a Medicare covered service. If finances are limited, it may be of benefit to contact the local Area Agency on Aging to help provide more care in the home.

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    A senior for whom I care needs some counseling and an opportunity to talk to someone. I think therapy could really help manage their anxieties about the onset of old age and dementia.
    Is this a service that can be provided and then covered by their medicare and medicaid?
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    Nancy W. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Fortunately, Medicare does cover counseling/psychotherapy services for seniors when they are provided by a Licensed Clinical Social Worker or a Psychologist. If the senior also has Medicare Supplemental Insurance ("Medigap" coverage), then the copay is typically covered, as well. The person for whom you care could definitely benefit from counseling, to manage their physical, emotional and cognitive changes, and process their feelings of anxiety, grief, and confusion about these changes. They can learn coping strategies, ways to soothe and manage their stress, anxiety reduction techniques, and receive much-needed support. They can talk about their concerns, and receive education, along with tools to improve their functioning. My agency provides in-home counseling for seniors, and let me know if I can help further.
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    Leonard B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Ask your doctor for a referral to a mental health professional or a community mental health center. When you call for an appointment they can confirm that they take Medicare and/or Medicaid. Organizations such as the Alzheimer's Association also might have nearby support groups. Caregiver stress takes a toll on you and the older person.
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    Donald C. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Yes. Depending on your insurance choices, better to get a family doctor referral and then begin the therapy program.

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    We are trying to determine if one of my siblings is an actual caregiver by Medicaid's definition, but have not been able to find an actual definition from the Medicaid website. How does Medicaid officially define the term caregiver? Any help would be appreciated.
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    Christopher C. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    The answer depends on: (1) What services your sibling is providing, (2) Whether there is a written agreement defining the level and extent of care, and (3) whether the recipient is diverting his/her resources to your sibling to pay for the care. I need more information.
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    Jan S. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Are you sure you do not mean Medicare? Medicaid is known in California as Medi-CAL. In all other states it's known as Medicaid. I don't have sufficient knowledge about Medi-Cal. Would suggest you call the MediCaid office. If it's Medicare, I'd suggest you call you Medicare directly. They would probably not put it on their website.

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    My dad is well though Mom is not well. Can their joint finances go towards an MQA (Medicaid Qualifying Annuity)? THis is something a financial planner suggested, but it makes me nervous. particularly, because it comes from the planner? What does the law allow?
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    Lincoln S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    In Texas, the law does allow MQAs. Not every financial planner can do one though. There are many types of annuities -- an MQA is very specific. Our office uses a nationally recognized firm from Wisconsin: www.medicaidannuity.com.

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    Is there any difference between transferring assets to my spouse as opposed to my children? Would transfers to my spouse be exempt from the medicaid look back period under any circumstances?
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    Ronald F. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Transfers to spouses are exempt transfers for Medicaid penalty period purposes, but the spouse is only allowed to have limited assets. Transfers to children are usually not exempt except for a few classes of children such as disabled children.
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    Joan R. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Transfers made during the look back period to a spouse are exempt for nursing home care. All transfers are exempt for home are whether or not to a spouse. The family home may be may be transferred to a caregiving child for nursing home and home care without any inelugibity for medicaid. Ease note that the spouse not applying for benefits may have assets that exceed the resource level and hence be subject to claims of contribution by the government.
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    Benni V. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    This is a question that should be answered by an Elder Law attorney in the state the person resides.
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    Barbra L. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    Please be very careful. There are huge inaccuracies from people who have responded. Please seek an elder care attorney before any assets are transferred to your spouse!
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    Penelope M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    transfers to spouses are exempt.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Yes, a transfer to your spouse is exempt under any circumstances, although he or she may be sued for support, if resources exceed a threshold amount. A transfer to one's children is exempt only under limited circumstances.
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    Mary W. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    For medicaid purposes transfers of assets between spouses are exempt from the penalties applied to asset transfers. Transfers of assets between parent and child are not exempt unless the child fits into the protected classes: Disabled adult children, minor children, and with respect to the transfer of the home a caretaker child.
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    William M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Transfers to a spouse are generally not subject to medicaid lookback rules
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    Elliot S. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Your questions are complex. Neither transfer is exempt from the 5 year medicaid lookback period.
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    Lauren M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Transfers from an institutionalized spouse to a well spouse are exempt, but if either spouse transfers to children within the lookback, it would not be exempt for purposes of Medicaid for the ill spouse.

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    What is considered "property"? Are there certain types of property that are exempt from this look back? For example, if I would transfer a house and a car would the same rules apply to both of them?
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    John B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    No transfer is exempt from the lookback which simply means it has to be revealed. However, many transfers do not result in a period of ineligibility depending on the type of Medicaid one is applying for, the asset transferred and the person to whom the transfer is made.
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    Valorie P. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    This is a complicated question that is predicated on family consultation with Medicaid rules. This needs more analysis.
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    Rosemarie R. , Geriatric Care Manager answers:
    A car and a home are treated differently as transfers and it depends on what type of Medicaid as well. I would rather speak directly to the person inquiring as this is a complicated question and requires a complicated answer.
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    David T. , Financial Planner answers:
    In which state are you looking to apply for Medicaid? And are you referring to Institutional Medicaid?
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    Jonathan B. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Assuming you are in NJ: There are exempt assets and transfers of exempt assets are not penalized, BUT the exemption usual depends on ho the property is used and owned, so transfer may be indication that it was no longer exempt. Sonya is wrong that a car is noever exempt - it may be if needed to transport the owner. You should not make any transfers without discussing your specific situation with an elder law/estate planning attorney who can advise you on Medicaid, gift and estate laws and impact of what you are planning to do. The wrong step could cost you anywhere from thousands of dollars.
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    Penelope M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Short answer is no difference but it depends on who is the owner and to whom the transfer is made.
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    William M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Generally speaking the same rules would apply. There are exceptions such as if a disabled child is in the house or the car is transferred to a child living in the house and providing care.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Property is anything you own. There are exempt transfers Same rules donot aply toa house asnd car Acar is never exempt, A house might be depending upon whom you transfer it to.
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    Sonya M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Property is anything the person owns, and yes there are exemptions for property. No the same rules would not apply to a house and car. For while, a car is never exempt, a house may or may not be exempt depending upon to whom it is transfered. A house is exempt if transferred to a caregiver child or a sibling with an equity interest.
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    Lauren M. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    If you own property with any value, and you transfer it for less than that value within the lookback period, the amount of the transfer will be assessed and a penalty period will be imposed. For example, if you own a vacation cabin with $15,000 value and you transfer it for $1 to a family member (who isn't disabled) within the Medicaid five year lookback, you will be assessed a penalty based on a divisor (in my state, it's $7757 a month or $256 a day) and the value of the property. So in this example, the penalty would be 58 days where you wouldn't get Medicaid because you gave the cabin away within the lookback.

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    My 92 year old mom is running out of money for her care. She will be broke in a little over a year I do not have money to take care of her. What will happen when the money runs out? We live in California and currently she lives with my brother with a 24 hour care aide. We will have to let the aide go when the money runs out. She does get social security but has no pension otherwise. My deceased father was a WW II Vet. Any help there?
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    Mary L. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Contact Nursing Home Solutions

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    My mom requires some medicaid help. I am under the impression that her house in Burbank, in which she has been living for 37+ years is exempt under the rules of homestead.

    My question is this: is her house, after her passing, subject to seizure to make up from the money she took from medicaid?
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    Ronald A. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    Under California law, the family residence is exempt, as far as being eligible for benefits is concerned. Once the person benefiting from Medi-cal(that's what we have in California, rather than Medicaid) passes away, the department of health services does make a claim against the home. We can protect the home from the claim, in more than one way, but the most bullet-proof method is to place the home in an irrevocable trust. If done properly, the trust has several additional advantages. 1. it opens the door for veterans benefits, if the person otherwise qualifies, 2. it protects the home from capital gains tax exposure, if the home has gained in value, during the time of ownership, and 3. if there is any reason to sell the home during the time that the patient is confined to a facility, the proceeds of the sale are protected. Otherwise, the sale would have the effect of converting an exempt asset (the home) into a non-exempt asset(the cash), which would,if not protected, have the effect of rendering the patient ineligible for continuing benefits.

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    Does anyone know if the Medicare and Medicaid is structured in Puerto Rico in a way that is similar to the regulations governing the Continental United States?
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    Jordan R. , answers:
    If you are a resident of Puerto Rico, receive Social Security benefits and become eligible for Medicare, you automatically will receive Medicare hospital insurance (Part A). You will not automatically receive Medicare medical insurance (Part B). You must elect Part B during your initial enrollment period, or you will pay a higher premium due to a penalty. Part B helps pay for doctors’ services, outpatient care and some home health care. The following information will help you avoid a costly penalty and loss of coverage. See this government site for more information.

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    Overall, the home health care aide provided to my mom through medicaid is terrific. My mom is demented with Alzheimer's and the aide, let's call her Sarah, has been working with my mom for over a year. In the past month, however, I have been concerned that Sarah is getting a bit too stressed out by mom. I have suspicions that abuse of the verbal kind may be taking place on the say-so of the neightbors. I know that my mom can be difficult to manage, I wonder though if this aide, though not a bad person, needs to be swapped out. Should I get some totally new? Can I get another person to take over for Sarah on a temporary basis to give her some space? Can this be done within the current Medicaid regulations?
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    Terry B. , answers:
    Most definitely have a talk with Sarah. Burn-out is not an excuse for abuse. Your mom needs you to advocate for her--be her mouthpiece as she is dependent. Bringing the problem out in the open allows all to resolve the issues at hand and holds Sarah and the sending Agency accountable for providing quality care. Part of that care is for the caregiver to acknowledge her own needs. Sarah has probably been feeling unhappy with her declining ability to provide the care she once gave. The Agency should provide workshops, training, supervision on the issue of caregiver burn-out since this is almost a given problem for long-term caregivers. If Sarah and her Agency do nothing to rectify then it is in the best interest of your mom to seek out another Agency and Caregiver.
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    John T G. , Elder Law Attorney answers:
    This type of situation is delicate since you want the best care for your mother, but changes in caregivers or situations with Alzheimer patients can be detrimental to the patients. I would consider directly addressing the situation and communicate your concerns to the aide. If the situation does not improve, I would contact your local ASAP (Aging Services Access Point) or the corresponding agency that coordinates Medicaid services and ask to replace the current aide.
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    Jordan R. , answers:
    Wow, this sounds like a delicate and scary situation. In my time, counseling with family caregivers I have seen all of them become 'burned out'. The burn-out always takes place at different times for different people.

    It sounds like, in your case, the 'Sarah' the aide, has reached that point. When speaking with her, keep in mind that 'burn-out' is normal and does not represent a deficiency in her character or as a worker. Express that you value her work, and offer to give her some respite time. Respite is a normal part of caregiving, and perhaps, whether with or without extra compensation she will agree to take you up on taking a bit of respite, and then will come back refreshed and recommitted to caring for your mom. Good luck.

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    do you know an elderlaw attorney?
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    David T. , Financial Planner answers:
    If you are looking to apply for Medicaid, I can be of assistance to you at a very cost effective rate. Check out my profile and give me a call if you would like to learn more.

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